Fermented Foods

You can support your gut health with fermented, nutrient-potent foods. Ranging from tangy to bitterly-sweet in flavor, these foods originated decades ago in the cultures of Japan, China, India, and Germany.
Fermenting imbues foods with the health-enhancing properties of live bacteria, providing an ample source of probiotics, which are essential to a strong digestive tract. Probiotics help build up antibodies to pathogens and provide for a strong “gut immunity” which is key to maintaining overall vibrant health.
Fermented Foods Short List

  • Cultured Dairy: Yogurt, kefir, buttermilk, sour cream, and some cheeses
  • Veggies: Beets, radishes, tomatoes, onions, garlic, kimchi, green beans, sauerkraut
  • Condiments fermented at home or commercially: ketchup, relish, salsa, chutney
  • Other: Miso, tempeh, tofu, soy sauce, and kombucha (check that sugar content is not high on any pre-packaged or bottled fermented food).

Tips for Choosing & Storing Fermented Food

  1. Food labels must be marked “fermented.”
  2. Fermented and “pasteurized” do not go together. Pasteurization kills live cultures.
  3. Pickled is not the same as fermented (unless indicated on the label). Pickled foods are soaked in vinegar or brine.
  4. Choose organic, non-GMO items or locally farmed products.
  5. All fermented foods must be kept cool to maintain the live cultures.

Adding Fermented Foods to Your Daily Diet

When introducing fermented foods to your daily diet, start with small servings such as 1-2x a day. A few easy ways to sneak in fermented foods: Toss fermented veggies into salads or rice dishes. Enjoy fermented food as a snack or as a side dish (e.g., beets, tempeh, kimchi). Add a spoonful of a fermented food to your morning smoothie (e.g., beets, kefir)

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Fermented foods not your thing?

An alternative to fermented foods are quality probiotics and prebiotics in tablet, capsule and powder forms. Our office has researched the most effective probiotics tailored to specific needs like weight loss, women’s genitourinary health, detoxification, and brain support such as mood disorders.  Though we carry many quality refrigerated brands, not all types need to be refrigerated. Talk to our team about which product suits you best. 

  You can also order these pure products from Klaire Labs 1-888-488-2488  code W-11
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Fermented Vegetable Medley

When you hunger for something tangy, nutritionally potent, and full of beneficial bacteria to help heal an aggravated digestive tract, fermented veggies are a wonderful option. They’re a great side to any meal (vegan or carnivore) and can be added to a hearty stews. This recipe gives you a variety of options, with a focus on veggies that are least likely to irritate those with sensitive digestion.

Equipment Needed for Preparation & Storage

  • 1-gallon or 4-liter glass, enameled or clay jar which will be your fermentation jar
  • 1 small plate that fits into the fermentation jar
  • 1 small glass jar, filled with water

Ingredients 

  • 1 head of red cabbage, roughly cut
  • 1 medium-size beetroot, sliced
  • Handful of garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 T of sea salt
  • 1 t. dill seeds or dill herb (fresh or dry)

Personal Choice of Additional veggies & herbs: carrots, bell pepper, fennel, parsnip, radish, shredded broccoli, etc.

Preparation 

  • Combine all the vegetables and herbs and put them into the fermentation jar. The amount of vegetables should not go beyond the half-way mark on the jar.
  • Fill the rest of the jar with filtered water and add salt.
  • Float the small plate on top and submerge it with the small jar (filled with water to keep it down). This way the vegetables won’t float to the top and get moldy.
  • Leave to ferment for 1-2 weeks at room temperature.
  • You will know the medley is ready when the vegetables are soft and tangy.
  • To stop the fermentation process, transfer the medley to smaller jars and keep them in the fridge; they keep well for weeks.

References