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Roasted Fig and Goat Cheese Recipe with Video!

The Fig: Sweet. Succulent. Sensual.

Lucious-FigsOne of the “Seven Spices of Israel” and referenced in many religious texts as a sacred fruit, the fig (Angeer), is rich in nutrition and history.
For centuries, figs have been referenced in mythology and traditional medicine as a powerful sexual supplement. While they have yet to be adequately studied as an aphrodisiac in humans, some animal studies show figs can increase sperm count and motility. Additionally, they are a great source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, and the antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E.
The fig offers a unique combination of textures – chewy flesh, smooth skin, and crunchy seeds. California figs are typically harvested June through September. European varieties are available into the fall months. The majority of figs are dried fruits that can be enjoyed anytime of the year.
When selecting dried figs, they should be plump and soft. They will keep for long periods in a cool, dry place. When choosing fresh figs, which are beautifully delicate, select those with deep color, little bruising and sweet fragrance. Keep them in the fridge and plan to eat them in one or two days; don’t wash until ready to eat. If figs are not yet ripe, keep them at room temperature to ripen.

Figs can add a sweet sensation to just about any dish. But the high fiber can produce a laxative effect, so don’t over do.

[su_vimeo url=”https://vimeo.com/176868829″ width=”720″]

Roasted Fig and Goat Cheese

You can swoon over the delectable combination of sweet, ripe fig filled with creamy goat cheese and drizzled with tangy balsamic and honey. All natural and gluten free, perfect for a romantic appetizer or healthy snacking after a little love in the afternoon!
Ingredients
12 Black Mission figs, halved vertically
1 Tbs unsalted butter
3 Tbs balsamic vinegar
3 Tbs honey
2-3 ounces fresh goat cheese
Flaky sea salt, to taste
Preparation:
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
While the oven preheats, melt the butter in a small saucepan, along with the balsamic vinegar, honey, and a hefty pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook about 5 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
Place the figs, cut side up, in a baking dish the size of a pie pan. Top each fig half with a 1/2 tsp to 1 tsp of goat cheese. Drizzle the balsamic vinegar syrup over the figs.
Roast in the oven until very soft, 10 to 15 minutes.
Arrange on a platter and sprinkle with flaky salt.

Keeping a Mind-Body Food Journal for Health and Healing

Keep a Mind-Body Food Journal for Health and HealingKeeping a mind-body food journal

How would you like to understand, once and for all, the relationship between what you’re eating and how you feel? Keep a mind-body food journal. It’s a powerful way to gain insight into eating habits and the impact of food choices on your mental and physical well-being. A mind-body food journal is different from a “diet diary” because the intention is different: it’s not just about the fit of your jeans, it’s about how food fits your life and your lifestyle.
Too often we eat mindlessly – on the run, watching television, behind the computer. A mind-body food journal helps create clarity between what we choose and how we feel. It leads the way to improved choices and – because food is medicine – supports total mind-body health and healing.
Start your journal today. Track your eating habits for a few weekdays and at least one weekend day. Do this for at least two weeks.

What to Track in a Mind-Body Food Journal

Food Factors
When did you eat?
What did you eat?
How much did you eat?
Why did you eat?
How did you feel after eating?
Mind Factors
What was your overall mood before and after eating?
Did you have headaches, or mental/emotional fatigue?
Body Factors
What did you notice about your body before and after eating?
Social & Environmental Factors
Who were you with for the meal?
Did you eat hurriedly or calmly?
Were you doing another activity while eating?
Review your journal at the end of each day and summarize your habits. Note the key factors for why you chose to eat the way you did, what was going on, how you felt and if there were any physical symptoms. You and Dr. Myra Reed’s staff can use this information to help make healthier food choices.